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== Overview ==
 
== Overview ==
   
In September 2000, five different Sections of the ABA, including Business Law, Dispute Resolution, Litigation, International and Intellectual Property, jointly created a '''Task Force on Electronic Commerce and Alternative Dispute Resolution''' to propose protocols, workable guidelines and [[standard]]s that can be implemented by parties to [[online transaction]]s and by [[ODR]] providers. The Task Force was asked to focus specifically on “the challenges raised by multijurisdictional business-to-business (“B2B”) and business-to-consumer (“B2C”) transactions.”
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In September 2000, five different Sections of the ABA, including Business Law, Dispute Resolution, Litigation, International and Intellectual Property, jointly created a '''Task Force and Advisory Committee on E-commerce and ADR''' to propose protocols, workable guidelines and [[standard]]s that can be implemented by parties to [[online transaction]]s and by [[ODR]] providers. The Task Force was asked to focus specifically on “the challenges raised by multijurisdictional business-to-business (“B2B”) and business-to-consumer (“B2C”) transactions.”
   
 
The Task Force submitted its final report, titled [[Addressing Disputes in Electronic Commerce]] in 2002.
 
The Task Force submitted its final report, titled [[Addressing Disputes in Electronic Commerce]] in 2002.

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