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== Overview ==
 
== Overview ==
   
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{{Quote|[[Testing]] techniques can be grouped roughly into three classes: (1) random testing involves selection of [[data]] across the environment, often with some frequency distribution; (2) structural testing involves generating test cases from a [[program]] itself, forcing known behavior onto the [[program]]; and (3) functional testing uses the specified functions of a [[program]] as the basis for defining test cases.<ref>[[Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age]], at 109-10.</ref>}}
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{{Quote|Testing techniques can be grouped roughly into three classes: (1) random testing involves selection of [[data]] across the environment, often with some frequency distribution; (2) structural testing involves generating test cases from a [[program]] itself, forcing known behavior onto the [[program]]; and (3) functional testing uses the specified functions of a [[program]] as the basis for defining test cases."<ref>[[National Research Council]], [[Computer Science and Telecommunications Board]], [[System Security Study Committee]], Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age 109-10 (1991) ([http://www.nap.edu/catalog/1581.html full-text]).</ref>}}
   
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
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[[Category:Security]]
 
[[Category:Security]]
 
[[Category:Definition]]
 
[[Category:Definition]]
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[[Category:Testing]]
 

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