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A '''plug-in electric vehicle''' ('''PEV''')
 
A '''plug-in electric vehicle''' ('''PEV''')
   
{{Quote|get their power from the [[electric grid]]. There are two kinds of PEVs: (1) [[Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles]] ([[PHEV]]s) use both gasoline and electricity. [[PHEV]]s are similar to today's hybrids but have larger batteries and a plug for charging; and (2) [[Battery electric vehicle]]s ([[BEV]]s) use only electricity. [[BEV]]s do not use any gasoline.<ref>[[Smart Grid Information Clearinghouse]], "Acronyms" ([http://www.sgiclearinghouse.org/Acronyms full-text]).</ref>}}
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{{Quote|get their power from the [[electric grid]]. There are two kinds of PEVs: (1) [[Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle]]s ([[PHEV]]s) use both gasoline and electricity. [[PHEV]]s are similar to today's hybrids but have larger batteries and a plug for charging; and (2) [[Battery electric vehicle]]s ([[BEV]]s) use only electricity. [[BEV]]s do not use any gasoline.<ref>[[Smart Grid Information Clearinghouse]], "Acronyms" ([http://www.sgiclearinghouse.org/Acronyms full-text]).</ref>}}
   
 
== Privacy issues ==
 
== Privacy issues ==

Latest revision as of 01:11, 30 September 2013

Definition[]

A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)

get their power from the electric grid. There are two kinds of PEVs: (1) Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) use both gasoline and electricity. PHEVs are similar to today's hybrids but have larger batteries and a plug for charging; and (2) Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) use only electricity. BEVs do not use any gasoline.[1]

Privacy issues[]

Charging PEVs raises the possibility of tracking physical location through new energy consumption data.

References[]