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[[NIST]], Guidelines for Securing Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Systems ('''NIST Special Publication 800-98''') (Apr. 2007) ([http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-98/SP800-98_RFID-2007.pdf full-text]).
 
[[NIST]], Guidelines for Securing Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Systems ('''NIST Special Publication 800-98''') (Apr. 2007) ([http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-98/SP800-98_RFID-2007.pdf full-text]).
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== Overview ==
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[[Radio frequency identification]] ([[RFID]]) presents [[security]] and [[privacy]] [[risk]]s that must be carefully [[mitigate]]d through management, operational, and technical controls in order to realize the numerous benefits the technology has to offer. This document provides an overview of [[RFID]] technology, the associated [[security]] and [[privacy]] [[risk]]s, and recommended practices that will enable organizations to realize productivity improvements while [[safeguard]]ing [[sensitive information]] and protecting the [[privacy]] of individuals. While [[RFID]] [[security]] is a rapidly evolving field with a number of promising [[innovation]]s expected in the coming years, these guidelines focus on controls that are commercially available today.

Revision as of 16:47, 14 March 2012

Citation

NIST, Guidelines for Securing Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Systems (NIST Special Publication 800-98) (Apr. 2007) (full-text).

Overview

Radio frequency identification (RFID) presents security and privacy risks that must be carefully mitigated through management, operational, and technical controls in order to realize the numerous benefits the technology has to offer. This document provides an overview of RFID technology, the associated security and privacy risks, and recommended practices that will enable organizations to realize productivity improvements while safeguarding sensitive information and protecting the privacy of individuals. While RFID security is a rapidly evolving field with a number of promising innovations expected in the coming years, these guidelines focus on controls that are commercially available today.