The IT Law Wiki
(Created page with ''''International terrorism''' means activities that: :(1) involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or …')
 
 
(2 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
  +
== Definition ==
  +
 
'''International terrorism''' means activities that:
 
'''International terrorism''' means activities that:
   
Line 6: Line 8:
 
::(B) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or
 
::(B) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or
 
::(C) to affect the conduct of a government by assassination or kidnapping; and
 
::(C) to affect the conduct of a government by assassination or kidnapping; and
:(3) occur totally outside the United States, or transcend national boundaries in terms of the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they appear intended to coerce or intimidate, or the locale in which their perpetrators operate or seek asylum.<ref>50 U.S.C. 1801(c).</ref>
+
:(3) occur totally outside the United States, or transcend national boundaries in terms of the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they appear intended to coerce or intimidate, or the locale in which their perpetrators operate or seek asylum.<ref>50 U.S.C. §1801(c).</ref>
   
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
 
<references />
 
<references />
  +
  +
== See also ==
  +
  +
* [[International terrorist]]
 
[[Category:Security]]
 
[[Category:Security]]
 
[[Category:Legislation]]
 
[[Category:Legislation]]
 
[[Category:Legislation-U.S.-Federal]]
 
[[Category:Legislation-U.S.-Federal]]
  +
[[Category:Terrorism]]
  +
[[Category:Definition]]

Latest revision as of 18:28, 4 September 2011

Definition[]

International terrorism means activities that:

(1) involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State, or that would be a criminal violation if committed within the jurisdiction of the United States or any State;
(2) appear to be intended —
(A) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;
(B) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or
(C) to affect the conduct of a government by assassination or kidnapping; and
(3) occur totally outside the United States, or transcend national boundaries in terms of the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they appear intended to coerce or intimidate, or the locale in which their perpetrators operate or seek asylum.[1]

References[]

  1. 50 U.S.C. §1801(c).

See also[]