The IT Law Wiki
(Created page with ''''Extraterritoriality''' is the state of being exempt from the jurisdiction of local law, usually as the result of diplomatic negotiations. Extraterritoriality can also be a…')
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
'''Extraterritoriality''' is the state of being exempt from the [[jurisdiction]] of local law, usually as the result of diplomatic negotiations. Extraterritoriality can also be applied to physical places, such as military bases of foreign countries, or offices of the United Nations. The three most common cases recognized today internationally relate to the persons and belongings of foreign heads of state, the persons and belongings of ambassadors and certain other diplomatic agents, and public ships in foreign waters.
 
'''Extraterritoriality''' is the state of being exempt from the [[jurisdiction]] of local law, usually as the result of diplomatic negotiations. Extraterritoriality can also be applied to physical places, such as military bases of foreign countries, or offices of the United Nations. The three most common cases recognized today internationally relate to the persons and belongings of foreign heads of state, the persons and belongings of ambassadors and certain other diplomatic agents, and public ships in foreign waters.
  +
  +
  +
{{Wikipedia|Extraterritoriality}}
 
[[Category:Jurisdiction]]
 
[[Category:Jurisdiction]]

Revision as of 04:31, 17 January 2010

Extraterritoriality is the state of being exempt from the jurisdiction of local law, usually as the result of diplomatic negotiations. Extraterritoriality can also be applied to physical places, such as military bases of foreign countries, or offices of the United Nations. The three most common cases recognized today internationally relate to the persons and belongings of foreign heads of state, the persons and belongings of ambassadors and certain other diplomatic agents, and public ships in foreign waters.


This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors). Smallwikipedialogo.png