The IT Law Wiki

This wiki's URL has been migrated to the primary fandom.com domain.Read more here

READ MORE

The IT Law Wiki
Advertisement

Definitions[]

Artificial general intelligence (also referred to as General AI or AGI) is

the intelligence of a (hypothetical) machine that could successfully perform any intellectual task that a human being can. It is a primary goal of artificial intelligence research and an important topic for science fiction writers and futurists.
a notional future AI system that exhibits apparently intelligent behavior at least as advanced as a person across the full range of cognitive tasks.[1]
an AI system that exhibits intelligence comparable to that of a human, or beyond, across the range of contexts in which a human might interact.[2]

Overview[]

"Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) is a research area within AI, small as measured by numbers of researchers or total funding, that seeks to build machines that can successfully perform any task that a human might do. Where AI is oriented around specific tasks, AGI seeks general cognitive abilities. On account of this ambitious goal, AGI has high visibility, disproportionate to its size or present level of success, among futurists, science fiction writers, and the public."[3]

"AGI seeks to develop machines with 'generalized' human intelligence, capable of sustaining long-term goals and intent, or, more generally 'perform any intellectual task that a human being can.' Where AI is oriented around specific tasks, AGI seeks general cognitive abilities. On account of this ambitious goal, AGI has high visibility, disproportionate to its size or present level of success. Further, as this report elaborates in subsequent sections, the breakout technologies that have put us in a 'golden age' of AI, may impact AGI only modestly." [4]

"Expert opinion on the expected arrival date of AGI ranges from 2030 to centuries from now. There is a long history of excessive optimism about AI. For example, AI pioneer Herb Simon predicted in 1957 that computers would outplay humans at chess within a decade, an outcome that required 40 years to occur. Early predictions about automated language translation also proved wildly optimistic, with the technology only becoming usable (and by no means fully fluent) in the last several years. It is tempting but incorrect to extrapolate from the ability to solve one particular task to imagine machines with a much broader and deeper range of capabilities and to overlook the huge gap between narrow task-oriented performance and the type of general intelligence that people exhibit."[5]

Fictional examples of general AI include the computer H.A.L., from the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Lieutenant Commander Data, from the Star Trek: The Next Generation television series.

References[]

See also[]


This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors). Smallwikipedialogo.png
Advertisement