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{{Quote|''As early as 1798, Congress enacted the Sedition Act, now widely regarded as a violation of the most fundamental principles of freedom of expression.''<ref>[[Liberty and Security in a Changing World]], at 53.</ref>}}
 
{{Quote|''As early as 1798, Congress enacted the Sedition Act, now widely regarded as a violation of the most fundamental principles of freedom of expression.''<ref>[[Liberty and Security in a Changing World]], at 53.</ref>}}
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The Acts consisted of four bills passed by the Federalists in the 5th [[U.S. Congress]] and signed into law by President John Adams in 1798 in the aftermath of the French Revolution and during an undeclared naval war with France, later known as the Quasi-War.
 
The Acts consisted of four bills passed by the Federalists in the 5th [[U.S. Congress]] and signed into law by President John Adams in 1798 in the aftermath of the French Revolution and during an undeclared naval war with France, later known as the Quasi-War.

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